Research Writing Project Brainstorm

Social causes:

Because of my pragmatic philosophy background, I’m swayed this way, even more so when it comes to research writing. I think it’s a topic that’s even better for research writing than short course. The amount library resources and current events have to offer, plus if the focus was put onto social causes in Boston (the homeless issue, gang violence happening near Emerson, etc.)–it’d be a broad scope of what a project like this might be able to offer. I think about the public space of Himmer’s class sample and how that can relate to a social cause. There would be multiple genres available with this theme in mind: a profile of a homeless person; a letter to the state; a report on police changes occurring after the marijuana law passed; a commentary on illegal immigration policies–all of which would necessitate research.

Photoessays:

Right now, my group is brainstorming about photoessays because they can have a broad scope. A student could write about their family, using pictures of their family, and research their ancestry; or a student could take up a social cause by photographing the homeless population. In any case, the focus will still need to be put on the rhetorical situation, the proposition and the reasons, to an extent. I think a photoessay would work really well toward the movement to the final showcase, since it would be very much “seen” by the larger community.

An influential person:

I’ve also been considering with the idea of profiling an influential figure in a student’s life. I know such a project might become very “young,” like a project on heroes. But I think taking that type of inventory can help guide freshman who are currently embarking on their adult lives. Whether its a famous musician or family member, figuring out why someone is influential can help establish a student’s identity and place in the world. This project, too, could take on multiple genres outside of profiling, such as memoir or commentary, or even if they were to write a letter to the person (a letter, again, might be a little “middle schooly” but I think it could still be elevated into the language of the university). I’d offer these students academic articles; I can think of a few philosophers who have discussed influence and recognition, and I can think of famous speeches from the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame about a musician’s impact on another; as well as the topic of “Art” itself and the passing down of values and culture (Marshal McLuhan, Hans Aarsleff). I think this topic could suit a college classroom if the readings are academic and research on the subject matter is more than “interviewing my mom.”